Triberr, Twitter, LinkedIn & Livefyre

Writing

I don’t know about you but Triberr, Twitter, LinkedIn & Livefyre sounds like a tongue twister to me. Been thinking about all of the aforementioned and more….

Been a part of Triberr for several months now, that means more than two and less than a decade. For those who are unfamiliar with it Triberr represents a tremendous resource for bloggers. What it does is provide a simple way for bloggers to increase their reach exponentially. In theory it is a tool that small bloggers can use to try and broadcast their message to a much larger audience than ever before. And while that’s certainly true it is a mistake to try and use it solely as a bigger soapbox and microphone than you could before.

The real strength in Triberr lies in its ability to help you connect and engage with others. Triberr is what led to my connection with Gini and Lisa and the guest post that followed at Spin Sucks. Triberr is what led me to make connections with a ton of other bloggers too. Really, I could and should link to a bunch of others. Really I should link to a lot of other bloggers that come from other places around the blogosphere because it is the people that make it run.  And that is something that I think that we forget sometimes.

What I mean is that we often talk about content being king and the importance of trying to make every post amazing. We talk about how there is a low barrier to entry and how anyone with a computer and an internet connection can set up a blog. We talk about all of the distractions that compete with our very important blogs but sometimes I think that we forget to stress that we need to talk with and not to people. Stop broadcasting and listen for a moment.

My kids and I talk about this. We talk about being conscious and aware of our surroundings. We talk about paying attention to our friends and the importance of giving back. It is important to me that I do something to help them see how much more the world has to offer when we don’t just take. Well, sometimes I think that I forget about that. Sometimes I get so caught up in all of the chaos that I miss the mark. So while I am busy pushing them to do and to give I don’t.

That brings me to Twitter. A friend recently complained that my Twitter stream seems to be filled with nothing but links. I didn’t conduct any sort of analysis so I can’t say that she is wrong. It wouldn’t surprise me to find out that she is right because part of being in Triberr means that I help my tribesmen by tweeting their posts just as they do for mine.  The takeaway message from this is not to stop and measure what I am doing. Frankly I don’t have time. I am in the midst of riding out a storm so the last thing I want to do is track every tweet.

But what I can do is try to make a point to engage more. I can make a point of trying to make sure that I am doing a better job of interacting with people on Twitter.

And that my friends brings us to the ever so lovely and engaging LinkedIn. Dear LinkedIn the professional social network that we use to try and improve our lot in life by finding a better job. Something more fulfilling that pays six times what we are currently earning and requires that we work six times less. Lovely little LinkedIn where so many people ask their friends, family and colleagues for a recommendation. Well, I am here to say that think that quite a few of the recommendations are as my political science professor would have said, Balderdash. They are authentic frontier gibberish. The exaggerated tall tales of Pecos Bill and Paul Bunyan. In fact I believe that Babe The Blue Ox is more likely to come walking through my yard.

Ok, that is not true of all of the recommendations but quite a few are bunk. I have received more than a few requests from people asking me to scratch their back so that they can scratch mine. That sort of defeats the purpose of it. That devalues the recommendation and makes me question all of them. Maybe it is unfair of me to do so, but I just can’t see a reason not to.

On a related note, I have to fix my profile. It is lacking and I find this to be as troubling as the poor condition in which I find my resume. While I may protest that I am more than words it is still true that most prospective employers will begin engagement with me via that little piece of paper so I suppose that I should work on improving it. Or maybe I should just ask for recommendations from all of my contacts. If I get ten percent of them to give me one I’ll have 20 something reviews that I can use to toot my horn.

Because it is all about engagement and that is why I keep staring at that saucy temptress,  Livefyre. It is the commenting system that is supposed to turn your blog into something far more active and engaging. Use LiveFyre and watching your comments go from just a few to many. At least, that is the concept. Of course those wacky folks at Spin Sucks overwhelm my inbox with updates about who has said what and to whom. I have adjusted my settings from overwhelming amounts of notifications to slightly less frequent and I am still being besieged by emails.

I suppose that if they were all about me I would be less concerned. I suppose that if they were all tied into posts that I have written I would shrug my shoulders and smile. Smile broadly because in some corners of the blogosphere comments are considered to be currency and that would make me quite wealthy. Alas, that is not the case so I suppose that I shall just have to hope to one day be more than I am.

Or better yet I could take this moment to be less insouciant and remind myself that there is a correlation between blogs and icebergs. As you may know, three quarters of an iceberg is located underwater which means that only a tiny bit of the ‘berg is exposed. In the case of blogs it could be said that three quarters of the readers do not comment so it is really important to remember that you may have far more readers than you realize. There are those that are vocal and those that lurk just beneath the surface.

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Comments

  1. I just made the transition to LiveFyre. I am very curious to see if it is as effective here as it seems to be elsewhere.

  2. It’s a SMpalooza up in here Jack. Gonna try to keep this in check, FWIW:

    1) Triberr. Like that a lot of people get great value from it, that the team is responsive and adaptive to users. I’m just not an automation fan; I’ll find ways to improve my efficiency or not do it.. and yes miss out. I’d be a lousy tribe member and don’t have the time to kick all the blog tires before tweeting as I’d have to. 

    2) Twitter. If I’m busy elsewhere I ain’t tweeting. I’ll lurk by but that’s it. Even on days I’m sharing a lot of things, I still move it to the background to get other work done. Also need to mix in more conversation with the links.. and also just more thoughts.

    3) LinkedIn. Hilarious and would you write a recommendation if I promise to never pen one for you? 😉 I think I need to spend more time there, just not sure how best to do so. Other than fixing my sucky profile.

    4) Livefyre. Opted for never which will be find once they add a reply me so I can still see direct replies; I miss some conversations but I do have a cleaner inbox and less hectic days. 

    5) Lurkers. I have and hear from them once in a while, need to work on expanding and building the audience, all that clever blogging mumbo jumbo.

    • @davinabrewer:disqus I don’t blame you for not being a part of it. It is not for everyone. 
      Sometimes I shut Twitter down because I don’t want any distractions, but most of the time it is not a big deal. I pop in and out as needed.

      I can write a recommendation for you immediately- especially if you give me license to write whatever I feel like without regard, for truth, justice or the american way.

      Livefyre is sort of a hemming and hawing thing in my house. Don’t know if I want to kick the conversation up a notch ‘cuz work needs to be done. OTOH, that could lead to other opportunities.

      Lurkers are fascinating to me. I have some that pore through every post but never comment. I know that they aren’t bots and wonder what it is that they enjoy about this place.

      • Totally joking about the LI thing.. I’m with you on not asking for them, better if they happen organically. And it looks bad if there are too many back-and-forth scratching there. I know lots of my LI connections via SM, but not having worked directly with them it’d feel odd writing or receiving a rec. Maybe it’s me.. though your write-up would be fun. 

        Nothing is for everyone.. except maybe oxygen and water. I’ll do (or not use) Twitter and various SM tools my way, follow or unfollow as I think will benefit me and mine and fully respect those who do the same. Lurkers.. need to pay more attention to that, who’s actually clicking, how much time.. all that stuff. Always something.

  3. It’s a SMpalooza up in here Jack. Gonna try to keep this in check, FWIW:

    1) Triberr. Like that a lot of people get great value from it, that the team is responsive and adaptive to users. I’m just not an automation fan; I’ll find ways to improve my efficiency or not do it.. and yes miss out. I’d be a lousy tribe member and don’t have the time to kick all the blog tires before tweeting as I’d have to. 

    2) Twitter. If I’m busy elsewhere I ain’t tweeting. I’ll lurk by but that’s it. Even on days I’m sharing a lot of things, I still move it to the background to get other work done. Also need to mix in more conversation with the links.. and also just more thoughts.

    3) LinkedIn. Hilarious and would you write a recommendation if I promise to never pen one for you? 😉 I think I need to spend more time there, just not sure how best to do so. Other than fixing my sucky profile.

    4) Livefyre. Opted for never which will be find once they add a reply me so I can still see direct replies; I miss some conversations but I do have a cleaner inbox and less hectic days. 

    5) Lurkers. I have and hear from them once in a while, need to work on expanding and building the audience, all that clever blogging mumbo jumbo.

    • @davinabrewer:disqus I don’t blame you for not being a part of it. It is not for everyone. 
      Sometimes I shut Twitter down because I don’t want any distractions, but most of the time it is not a big deal. I pop in and out as needed.

      I can write a recommendation for you immediately- especially if you give me license to write whatever I feel like without regard, for truth, justice or the american way.

      Livefyre is sort of a hemming and hawing thing in my house. Don’t know if I want to kick the conversation up a notch ‘cuz work needs to be done. OTOH, that could lead to other opportunities.

      Lurkers are fascinating to me. I have some that pore through every post but never comment. I know that they aren’t bots and wonder what it is that they enjoy about this place.

      • Totally joking about the LI thing.. I’m with you on not asking for them, better if they happen organically. And it looks bad if there are too many back-and-forth scratching there. I know lots of my LI connections via SM, but not having worked directly with them it’d feel odd writing or receiving a rec. Maybe it’s me.. though your write-up would be fun. 

        Nothing is for everyone.. except maybe oxygen and water. I’ll do (or not use) Twitter and various SM tools my way, follow or unfollow as I think will benefit me and mine and fully respect those who do the same. Lurkers.. need to pay more attention to that, who’s actually clicking, how much time.. all that stuff. Always something.

  4. Some of us read and write for the sake of the writing AND the connections AND the discussion. As you say, it really needs to be a conversation *with* people. Interactive. Or we’re talking to ourselves.

    • @biglittlewolf:disqus  The connections with others make the biggest impact. It is just so important for people to connect with others. It is a pleasure to write, but the chance to discuss and socialize is significant.

  5. Some of us read and write for the sake of the writing AND the connections AND the discussion. As you say, it really needs to be a conversation *with* people. Interactive. Or we’re talking to ourselves.

    • @biglittlewolf:disqus  The connections with others make the biggest impact. It is just so important for people to connect with others. It is a pleasure to write, but the chance to discuss and socialize is significant.

  6. G’Day Jack,
    I am not the last of the GEAs–Great Early Adopters. So I’ve just got a facebook fan page up and have joined LinkedIn. I’m trying to figure Twitter out. As I’m something of a web moron, Twitter’s proving to be a bit of a struggle.

    Nevertheless, anyone who uses the word “insouciant” merits respect. I’m not entirely certain what it means. It just sounds so good.

    Stand in front of a mirror and say it slowly and expressively. For a fleeting moment, you’ll feel as if you’re ordering a baguette in Bayonne.

    As you might have noticed, I love to write. I worked out recently that I’ve been a “published author” for over 50 years. I discovered ages ago that it doesn’t matter how much I love to write. What matters is finding people who love to read.

    No matter: Mark Twain already said most things worth saying. However, it was George Burns who said, “When I was a boy, the Dead Sea was only sick.”

    Regards from your Curmudgeon From Down Under….

    Leon

    • “Finding people who love to read.”

      Yes.

    • @3884c43f625610ab1bb99b677867ea2a:disqus As you know, Twain is easily one of my biggest heroes. To be able to write as well as he would be quite an accomplishment and honor.

      As for the Dead Sea, well I have been there many times- well worth the visit. I know that wasn’t the point of the comment, but I thought that I’d share it anyway.

  7. G’Day Jack,
    I am not the last of the GEAs–Great Early Adopters. So I’ve just got a facebook fan page up and have joined LinkedIn. I’m trying to figure Twitter out. As I’m something of a web moron, Twitter’s proving to be a bit of a struggle.

    Nevertheless, anyone who uses the word “insouciant” merits respect. I’m not entirely certain what it means. It just sounds so good.

    Stand in front of a mirror and say it slowly and expressively. For a fleeting moment, you’ll feel as if you’re ordering a baguette in Bayonne.

    As you might have noticed, I love to write. I worked out recently that I’ve been a “published author” for over 50 years. I discovered ages ago that it doesn’t matter how much I love to write. What matters is finding people who love to read.

    No matter: Mark Twain already said most things worth saying. However, it was George Burns who said, “When I was a boy, the Dead Sea was only sick.”

    Regards from your Curmudgeon From Down Under….

    Leon

    • “Finding people who love to read.”

      Yes.

    • @3884c43f625610ab1bb99b677867ea2a:disqus As you know, Twain is easily one of my biggest heroes. To be able to write as well as he would be quite an accomplishment and honor.

      As for the Dead Sea, well I have been there many times- well worth the visit. I know that wasn’t the point of the comment, but I thought that I’d share it anyway.

  8. I am part of Triberr but really don’t get it. Maybe I am in the wrong tribe or something. Maybe no one likes my blog. *shrugs* there are things I don’t get. Triberr is one of those things for me.

    Twitter is like crack for me. My bf jokes I am hopelessly addicted to Twitter. It is so bad, he sometimes makes me unplug from Twitter for whole weekends – and I get on Twitter as soon as he is in the bathroom. (I can quit anytime I want – really)

    I use LinkedIn – need to get on the ball with that more. I need to start answering questions and doing more with LinkedIn.

    Facebook is like a pair of comfy slippers for me. My friends are all there. I can be a little bit silly there (but not too much) Facebook brings me good traffic to my blog, and most of my childhood friends are on Facebook.

    Interesting to think how much I live on social networks. I guess “unplugging” every so often is not such a bad thing.

    • @twitter-117500958:disqus Hi Nancy,

      I think that it helps to know what you goals are for your blog and then see if Triberr will help you achieve them.

      Part of that involves looking at who is in your tribes. The tribe that I started with is a supertribe that has about 29 people in it. I have met some very interesting people and found great new blogs to read.

      But I think that my content and style aren’t of interest to a selection of them or so I suspect. They rarely visit or leave comments.

      Or it is entirely possible that they haven’t had time to really explore here and aren’t aware of what is being offered.

      But the tribes that I have built are different because we have been careful to try and more closely align interests and posts.

      For me the question has been more of a concern that I don’t tweet content that I find offensive or disruptive.

      Overall it really has been great and as I said I am grateful to have  been part of it. The people have been great.

  9. I am part of Triberr but really don’t get it. Maybe I am in the wrong tribe or something. Maybe no one likes my blog. *shrugs* there are things I don’t get. Triberr is one of those things for me.

    Twitter is like crack for me. My bf jokes I am hopelessly addicted to Twitter. It is so bad, he sometimes makes me unplug from Twitter for whole weekends – and I get on Twitter as soon as he is in the bathroom. (I can quit anytime I want – really)

    I use LinkedIn – need to get on the ball with that more. I need to start answering questions and doing more with LinkedIn.

    Facebook is like a pair of comfy slippers for me. My friends are all there. I can be a little bit silly there (but not too much) Facebook brings me good traffic to my blog, and most of my childhood friends are on Facebook.

    Interesting to think how much I live on social networks. I guess “unplugging” every so often is not such a bad thing.

    • @twitter-117500958:disqus Hi Nancy,

      I think that it helps to know what you goals are for your blog and then see if Triberr will help you achieve them.

      Part of that involves looking at who is in your tribes. The tribe that I started with is a supertribe that has about 29 people in it. I have met some very interesting people and found great new blogs to read.

      But I think that my content and style aren’t of interest to a selection of them or so I suspect. They rarely visit or leave comments.

      Or it is entirely possible that they haven’t had time to really explore here and aren’t aware of what is being offered.

      But the tribes that I have built are different because we have been careful to try and more closely align interests and posts.

      For me the question has been more of a concern that I don’t tweet content that I find offensive or disruptive.

      Overall it really has been great and as I said I am grateful to have  been part of it. The people have been great.

  10. Triberr! Some love it, some hate it, certainly doesn’t leave anyone indifferent. Great job @dino_dogan:twitter 

    I have a real preference for Twitter, I get on FB a bit and I admit I ignore LI. I simply don’t have the time for all. My social media time budget is 20hrs a week and I can’t strech it anymore.

    Yes to pulling the readers out from the ‘lurking stage’, this is what I learned from @thesaleslion:twitter about a successful post, one which makes the lurkers come out of hiding.

    Great post Jack and I met you because of Triberr 🙂 Thank you Triberr

    • @johnfalchetto:disqus Yes, I am grateful for the introduction too. Dan and Dino have done good work.

      Lurkers always interest me, especially those that show up daily and or dig through the archives. I often wonder what they have found of interest.

  11. Triberr! Some love it, some hate it, certainly doesn’t leave anyone indifferent. Great job @dino_dogan:twitter 

    I have a real preference for Twitter, I get on FB a bit and I admit I ignore LI. I simply don’t have the time for all. My social media time budget is 20hrs a week and I can’t strech it anymore.

    Yes to pulling the readers out from the ‘lurking stage’, this is what I learned from @thesaleslion:twitter about a successful post, one which makes the lurkers come out of hiding.

    Great post Jack and I met you because of Triberr 🙂 Thank you Triberr

    • @johnfalchetto:disqus Yes, I am grateful for the introduction too. Dan and Dino have done good work.

      Lurkers always interest me, especially those that show up daily and or dig through the archives. I often wonder what they have found of interest.

  12. I’ve been thinking about Triberr a lot lately, trying to figure out what I want to do. I’m usually very decisive…don’t know why I’m having so much trouble with this. Like Bill, I’m hot and cold on Twitter. One day I’m a tweeting fool, the next I feel like I’m just sending out links and not really engaging with people. I admit to neglecting LinkedIn of late, but I think I have a decent profile. If you ever need another set of eyes to proofread yours, I’d be happy to help. And then there’s Livefyre…I like the idea, but it’s just too much for me. I like my simple WP commenting with Commentluv. Lots to think about!

    • @marianneworley:disqus My two cents is that if you are interested in trying to grow your blog and expand your reach Triberr is a really good tool.

      My goals with my blog are simple.

      1) Practice writing.
      2) Gain new clients.
      3) Practice writing
      4) Meet interesting people.
      5) Practice writing.
      6) Be discovered by some publisher and get hired to write a book.

      But I do think that it also requires being engaged on Twitter to some extent. That is just my opinion, others might disagree.

    • Hey Marianne,
      I’m like you with Triberr. I was in then out then planning to get in and then not and now I’m getting in again. I don’t know why I couldn’t decide before but now it feels right so I’m going for it!
      What are you going to do?
      Lori

      • I’m leaning towards giving it a go. I need to take a closer look at the Triberr website. Just haven’t had time lately.

        • troublesometots says:

          I just got into triberr which is fairly amazing despite my appalling lack of blogger connections and twitter followers. And triberr is all about getting your blog posts out to a broader reach of twitter followers through having blogger connections. So given my appalingness in both categories, my triberr experience has been underwhelming.

          However the concept is really great if you have 5-7 blogger buddies who cover complementary topics and have a reasonably similar number of twitter followers (ie you all bring the same value to the equation).

          I struggle with networking because I WRITE about kids & and sleep however I don’t read OTHER blogs on that topic (am far more interested in blogging, social media, etc. OR snarky celebrity gossip stuff – none of which are helping my own blog at all).

          Anyway hope that helps!
          Alexis

  13. I’ve been thinking about Triberr a lot lately, trying to figure out what I want to do. I’m usually very decisive…don’t know why I’m having so much trouble with this. Like Bill, I’m hot and cold on Twitter. One day I’m a tweeting fool, the next I feel like I’m just sending out links and not really engaging with people. I admit to neglecting LinkedIn of late, but I think I have a decent profile. If you ever need another set of eyes to proofread yours, I’d be happy to help. And then there’s Livefyre…I like the idea, but it’s just too much for me. I like my simple WP commenting with Commentluv. Lots to think about!

    • @marianneworley:disqus My two cents is that if you are interested in trying to grow your blog and expand your reach Triberr is a really good tool.

      My goals with my blog are simple.

      1) Practice writing.
      2) Gain new clients.
      3) Practice writing
      4) Meet interesting people.
      5) Practice writing.
      6) Be discovered by some publisher and get hired to write a book.

      But I do think that it also requires being engaged on Twitter to some extent. That is just my opinion, others might disagree.

    • Hey Marianne,
      I’m like you with Triberr. I was in then out then planning to get in and then not and now I’m getting in again. I don’t know why I couldn’t decide before but now it feels right so I’m going for it!
      What are you going to do?
      Lori

      • I’m leaning towards giving it a go. I need to take a closer look at the Triberr website. Just haven’t had time lately.

        • I just got into triberr which is fairly amazing despite my appalling lack of blogger connections and twitter followers. And triberr is all about getting your blog posts out to a broader reach of twitter followers through having blogger connections. So given my appalingness in both categories, my triberr experience has been underwhelming.

          However the concept is really great if you have 5-7 blogger buddies who cover complementary topics and have a reasonably similar number of twitter followers (ie you all bring the same value to the equation).

          I struggle with networking because I WRITE about kids & and sleep however I don’t read OTHER blogs on that topic (am far more interested in blogging, social media, etc. OR snarky celebrity gossip stuff – none of which are helping my own blog at all).

          Anyway hope that helps!
          Alexis

  14. Jack, aloha.  You are so right about the great bloggers that we have met through Triberr.  In fact, just today, Marianne Worley who I met because of Triberr through you introduced me to 3Hats.  WOW! I can hardly wait to spend the time reading those great posts of hers.

    While comments are always welcome and appreciated, far more people visit than comment.  Sometimes they are rushed, sometimes they don’t really have a comment and then there are lots of people who read who are not bloggers.  Jack, I don’t think many non-bloggers comment.  What do you think?  Love your blog/iceberg correlation.

    Will leave you to your evening musings.  Until next time, aloha.  Janet

    • @twitter-45938040:disqus Ah, Davina is great. She is a lot of fun. The people are a big part of why I haven’t ever given up on this. So very interesting.

      As for comments, well I have heard a million different reasons why people do or do not so I don’t know what to believe. Some people say that they are intimidated, some say that they have nothing new to add others say XYZ.

      I guess it just makes me more appreciative of those who do comment. But like I said, the lurkers are always there and you never know who is reading.

      Thanks for coming by again. I’ll see you soon.

      • It’s true Jack! You don’t know who’s reading until they comment! I tend to welcome people when they “appear” for the first time, but then it occurred to me that likely it wasn’t the first time they read, just the first time they commented.

        I vote for Livefyre, though – the real-time aspect of it alone makes it worth it!
        Lori

        P.S. I DO like the edit button here, however!

  15. Jack, aloha.  You are so right about the great bloggers that we have met through Triberr.  In fact, just today, Marianne Worley who I met because of Triberr through you introduced me to 3Hats.  WOW! I can hardly wait to spend the time reading those great posts of hers.

    While comments are always welcome and appreciated, far more people visit than comment.  Sometimes they are rushed, sometimes they don’t really have a comment and then there are lots of people who read who are not bloggers.  Jack, I don’t think many non-bloggers comment.  What do you think?  Love your blog/iceberg correlation.

    Will leave you to your evening musings.  Until next time, aloha.  Janet

    • @twitter-45938040:disqus Ah, Davina is great. She is a lot of fun. The people are a big part of why I haven’t ever given up on this. So very interesting.

      As for comments, well I have heard a million different reasons why people do or do not so I don’t know what to believe. Some people say that they are intimidated, some say that they have nothing new to add others say XYZ.

      I guess it just makes me more appreciative of those who do comment. But like I said, the lurkers are always there and you never know who is reading.

      Thanks for coming by again. I’ll see you soon.

      • It’s true Jack! You don’t know who’s reading until they comment! I tend to welcome people when they “appear” for the first time, but then it occurred to me that likely it wasn’t the first time they read, just the first time they commented.

        I vote for Livefyre, though – the real-time aspect of it alone makes it worth it!
        Lori

        P.S. I DO like the edit button here, however!

  16. Ok, insouciant; I knew I could count on you for the word of the day.

    ‘We talk about being conscious and aware of our surroundings. We talk about paying attention to our friends and the importance of giving back. It is important to me that I do something to help them see how much more the world has to offer when we don’t just take’. Very appropriate and a good lesson to teach; typically the more you give (without expectations) the more you will receive in return.

    I am hot and cold w/ interacting on twitter; sometimes I get so deep in commenting, replying and posting I forget to even look at twitter. And when I do, it’s usually some joke that maybe only 2-3 of us are in on. Other than that I am promoting someone else. It probably drives my local followers crazy.

    I think you are absolutely correct in that we need to talk ‘with’ people not to them. Seems to work a lot better for me.

    It will be interesting to see how Triberr works out for me; I was invited to join one about a month ago but it wasn’t very active. I waited to even accept an invitation because I didn’t deem myself blog worthy yet. It didn’t bring much difference in traffic. I just recently (last wknd) was invited to join a much more active one so it will be interesting to see what, if anything changes for me.

    You had several good topics w/in the post and I think I only touched on a couple but thanks for sharing.

    Oh yeah, Livefyre……I had to shut off all comments; I was following the ‘wrong’ people. I would wake up and have 70 new e-mails sitting in my inbox and even then I wasn’t receiving all comments and maybe 2-3 pertained to me. Now I just need to remember who to go back to………..yikes…….

    Good to see you and hope all is well.

    • @a76049f6a32a1e633a732b81bafb98c9:disqus I have entire posts that are dedicated to vocabulary- that is what happens when you get involved with a word geek like me. But if you ask me to provide you with my favorite word I’ll say defenestrate.

      Twitter has been very good to me and a hell of a lot of fun. I have made good friends via Twitter, gained work and encountered people that I know in real life.

      Kind of an odd way to stumble upon them, but no big deal.

      I think that Triberr works best for those who have no expectations. Ride the wave and enjoy.

      Always a pleasure to see you here. Hope to see you again soon.

  17. Ok, insouciant; I knew I could count on you for the word of the day.

    ‘We talk about being conscious and aware of our surroundings. We talk about paying attention to our friends and the importance of giving back. It is important to me that I do something to help them see how much more the world has to offer when we don’t just take’. Very appropriate and a good lesson to teach; typically the more you give (without expectations) the more you will receive in return.

    I am hot and cold w/ interacting on twitter; sometimes I get so deep in commenting, replying and posting I forget to even look at twitter. And when I do, it’s usually some joke that maybe only 2-3 of us are in on. Other than that I am promoting someone else. It probably drives my local followers crazy.

    I think you are absolutely correct in that we need to talk ‘with’ people not to them. Seems to work a lot better for me.

    It will be interesting to see how Triberr works out for me; I was invited to join one about a month ago but it wasn’t very active. I waited to even accept an invitation because I didn’t deem myself blog worthy yet. It didn’t bring much difference in traffic. I just recently (last wknd) was invited to join a much more active one so it will be interesting to see what, if anything changes for me.

    You had several good topics w/in the post and I think I only touched on a couple but thanks for sharing.

    Oh yeah, Livefyre……I had to shut off all comments; I was following the ‘wrong’ people. I would wake up and have 70 new e-mails sitting in my inbox and even then I wasn’t receiving all comments and maybe 2-3 pertained to me. Now I just need to remember who to go back to………..yikes…….

    Good to see you and hope all is well.

    • @a76049f6a32a1e633a732b81bafb98c9:disqus I have entire posts that are dedicated to vocabulary- that is what happens when you get involved with a word geek like me. But if you ask me to provide you with my favorite word I’ll say defenestrate.

      Twitter has been very good to me and a hell of a lot of fun. I have made good friends via Twitter, gained work and encountered people that I know in real life.

      Kind of an odd way to stumble upon them, but no big deal.

      I think that Triberr works best for those who have no expectations. Ride the wave and enjoy.

      Always a pleasure to see you here. Hope to see you again soon.

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